BIO

I was born in Greenfield, Massachusetts with an abundance of art resources right next door at Lapointe's Color Centre, a shop owned by my parents. I used everything I could get my hands on in that store including brown bags, the backs of store receipts, and discontinued wallpaper books. The collage artist I am today began with a love of all kinds of paper and the smell of paste.

It was my father who provided me with my first art gallery. One night he came home from work, overalls and glasses spattered with housepaint as usual, but this time he had a huge slate with him from a job site. He took out a window and installed a blackboard in our dining room. Every holiday after that, I drew scenes and pictures to show off at family dinners.

My mother made sure all seven of her children had spending money by paying us to do chores around the house. I ironed handkerchiefs for a penny a piece, scrubbed the bathroom sink and vacuumed up chalkdust. Then I walked downtown to buy watercolor paints, a new box of Crayolas or more colored chalk.

As a collage artist I find tremendous fun in the hunt. I pore over old wallpaper books and discover a flower petal to tear into a mouth. I experiment with watercolor washes to rip into the weeping willows in the Boston Public Garden image. I find paper the color and thickness of sprinkles to top frosted donuts. The paper edge fascinates me. Much of my work is done in watercolor but I chose to work in gouache to achieve the black outline in the illustrations depicting a Southwest folktale.

Membership in the Society For Children's Book Writers and Illustrators since 1987 has enabled me to participate in the critique group for children's writers that meets at the Concord Public Library. I started my own critique group for illustrators in 1995, leading the group until 2001 and organizing group shows in the art galleries at two local libraries. In November of 2000 at the New England SCBWI conference my unpublished portfolio received an award for Most Accomplished Technique in Her Chosen Category.

Runaway Blue appeared in the May 2010 issue of Highlights magazine. Melanie Siegel illustrated the story.

Butterfly, Butterfly appeared in the July 2012 issue of High Five magazine. Amy Bates did the art for this poem about a child rescuing a butterfly trapped in a watering can using a leaf.

I balance my writing and illustrating work with educational consulting in the public schools and an early intervention practice servicing the needs of families with children who are deaf and hard of hearing. I live in Concord with my husband. We look forward to visits with our two adult sons. Past and present experiences as a parent and a teacher provide me with a continuous flow of ideas for writing and illustrating for children.